With Endress+Hauser’s Netilion System, Entire Water Networks Can Be Monitored, Optimized 24/7 from Any Screen, Anywhere

DCS Endress Hauser Netilion System 1 400

December 17, 2021

 

Endress+Hauser’s new Netilion Water Network Insights (NWNI) provides water and wastewater operators with all the critical data from their operations, from any location, any time of day and on any screen – a control room monitor, or a laptop, tablet or smart phone. Such unrivalled transparency can generate operational improvements, even important cost savings. NWNI interfaces with all levels of a water system wherever they are, offering utilities and process water monitors tailor-made solutions from a single source. These include everything from real-time monitoring of all field devices, providing components for data recording, transferring and archiving to performing data evaluation and one-of-a-kind forecasting functions.

From their screen of choice, users can view all measurement data, be it water volume, pressure, level or chemical quality parameters. In case of failures or if limit values are exceeded, an alarm is sent automatically via e‑mail or SMS to a smart device or the control room.

High level benefits of NWNI include complete transparency over all quantity- and quality-related parameters in drinking water, process water and wastewater networks, with the potential to identify opportunities to reduce operating and energy costs. It even can help users identify and set countermeasures to employ in case of failures.

NWNI offers a variety of evaluation and display options such as time curves, diagrams, tables or trend displays. By incorporating other data sources, such as weather data, it’s possible to create trend analyses and forecasts, e.g. about run-off behavior during heavy rainfall, water demand or expected water availability. The system features outstanding secure, flexible connectivity solutions. Communication is always encrypted and tamper-proof.

For drinking and process water, NWNI minimizes the need for routine walkarounds while still maintaining a full overview, even in the case of multiple, widely separated sources. It guarantees reliable control of water flows in spring tapping, elevated reservoirs, pipelines and in pumping and distribution stations. Users can keep a close eye on a broad range of measured values, including monitoring of water quantity and quality, and be assured of correct allocation and accounting for costs and reliable, overnight location of leaks.

For wastewater operators, Netilion Water Network Insights provides a reliable, real-time overview of all critical measured values, such as:

  • forecasts of in-/outflows or water quality using current weather data;
  • optimal sizing of wastewater treatment plants;
  • reliable control of water quality by accessing instrument data (ph value, oxygen, ammonium or phosphate);
  • accurate billing of wastewater charges thanks to precise flow and concentration measurement;
  • minimized risk of environmental harm by monitoring certain substance concentrations in the inlet.

With the integrated Heartbeat Technology testing function developed by Endress+Hauser, flowmeters can be monitored continuously, without interrupting the process. Their functional capability can be verified at the “push of a button” to produce evidence of consistently high measuring accuracy. This enables assured compliance with the regulations that apply to the measuring points. This performance data may even allow calibration intervals for flowmeters to be extended.

 

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